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Posts for tag: diabetes

By Greenleaf Dental Care
November 11, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: oral health   diabetes  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutDiabetesandOralHealth

People with diabetes have special concerns when it comes to dental care. In fact, 1 in every 5 cases of total tooth loss is linked to this widespread health condition. November is National Diabetes month, so it’s a good opportunity for us to answer some frequently asked questions about oral health and diabetes.

Q. Can I get a dental implant to replace a missing tooth even if I have diabetes?

A number of studies have shown that people with diabetes can be good candidates for dental implants, but there are some concerns regarding dental implant treatment, which involves minor surgery. Wounds tend to heal more slowly in people with diabetes, who are also more infection-prone than those without diabetes. In diabetic individuals with poor glucose control, research has also shown that it takes longer for the bone to heal after implant placement. We will take these (and other) factors into account when planning your implant treatment. However, in many situations even poorly controlled diabetes does not necessarily preclude dental implant treatment.

Q. I’ve heard people with diabetes have a higher risk for gum disease. Is that true?

Yes. Research shows that people with diabetes are more susceptible to periodontal (gum) disease, especially when their diabetes is poorly controlled. The reverse is also true: untreated periodontal disease can worsen blood sugar levels. So it’s important to manage both of these inflammatory conditions. If you notice the early signs of gum disease, such as inflamed or bleeding gums, please bring this to our attention. Early gum disease (gingivitis) is much easier to treat than more advanced forms—which can eventually lead to tooth loss.

Q. If I have diabetes, how can I protect my oral health?

Keep doing your best to control your blood sugar levels with exercise and a healthy diet—and stick to an effective daily oral hygiene routine, which includes both brushing and flossing and coming in for regular dental checkups and cleanings. Make sure to let us know what medications you are taking and update us on any changes. If you notice any mouth sores, swelling or inflammation, bring this to our attention as soon as possible.

If you have additional questions about diabetes and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

YoucanStillhaveImplantswithDiabetes-ifyouhaveitunderControl

If you're one of the more than 26 million people in the U.S. with diabetes, you know first hand how the disease impacts your life. That includes your dental health — and whether or not implants are a good tooth replacement option for you.

Diabetes is actually the name for a group of diseases affecting how your body processes glucose, a simple sugar that provides energy for the body's cells. The level of glucose in the blood is regulated by insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas. Diabetes causes the pancreas to either stop producing insulin (Type 1) or not produce enough (Type 2). Also in Type 2, the body can become unresponsive to the insulin produced.

The implications for either type are serious and can be life-threatening. If glucose levels are chronically too low or high the patient could eventually go blind, suffer nerve damage, or develop kidney disease. Diabetes also interferes with wound healing and creates a greater susceptibility for gangrene: diabetics thus have a higher risk for losing fingers, toes and limbs, and can even succumb to coma or death.

Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes. Fortunately, most people with this type can effectively manage it through diet, exercise and regular glucose monitoring; if need be, prescription medication can help regulate their levels. Even so, diabetics with their disease under control must still be alert to slower wound healing and a higher risk of infection.

Because implant placement is a minor surgical procedure, the aspects of diabetes related to healing, infection and inflammation could have an adverse impact on the ultimate success of the placement. Implant surgery creates a wound in the surrounding gum tissues and bone that will need to heal; the body's immune response in a diabetic can interfere with that process. And if infection sets in, the risks of implant failure increase.

But research has shown that diabetics with good glucose management have as high a success rate (over 95% after ten years) as non-diabetic patients. That means the implant option is a viable one for you as a diabetic — but only if you have your disease under control.

If you would like more information on the relationship between dental implants and other health conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Greenleaf Dental Care
November 11, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   diabetes  
DentalImplantsandDiabetes

Today, dental implants are an increasingly popular option for replacing lost teeth — an issue faced by many older Americans. It’s not hard to see why these high-tech prosthetic teeth are preferred: They look, “feel” and function just like natural teeth… and with proper care they can last the rest of your life. Unfortunately, many people who could benefit from implants also face an additional health problem: diabetes, a metabolic disease that can affect many different parts of the body, sometimes severely.  Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to nerve and tissue damage, and may adversely impact your oral health. So if you have diabetes, does it mean you won’t be able to get dental implants? 

The short answer is no — but there are some considerations that diabetics (and their health care providers) need to keep in mind. For example, it has been demonstrated that wounds in diabetics tend to heal more slowly, and are more prone to infection than those in non-diabetics. Also, people with diabetes sometimes experience a chronic inflammatory response, which can eventually lead to tissue damage or other problems.

Because the placement of dental implants requires minor surgery, dentists and researchers have questioned whether people with diabetes are good candidates for implants. Now there’s encouraging news: Several recent studies have come to the conclusion that many diabetics can indeed undergo an implant procedure without undue risk.

One key consideration is how well an individual can control his or her blood glucose levels. Researchers have found that diabetics with good blood glucose control, those with poor glucose control, and non-diabetics all have similar implant success rates (above 95%). However, in diabetics with poor glucose control, more time may be needed for the jawbone to heal in the area where the implant procedure was done. That doesn’t by any means rule out the placement of a dental implant — but it does mean that special considerations apply to individuals in this situation.

So if you are considering an implant procedure but have trouble controlling your blood glucose levels, ask us how we can help. Just remember that in most cases, having diabetes doesn’t mean you won’t be able to enjoy the benefits of dental implants. If you have additional questions, contact us or schedule an appointment.

By Greenleaf Dental Care
November 19, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TVHostMariaMenounosPutsDiabetesintheSpotlight

Maria Menounos, an independent filmmaker, actress, and co-host of daily entertainment news program Extra, learned at an early age about the importance of maintaining good general and dental health when her father, Constantinos, a Greek immigrant, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. As a result, her parents made sure the family consumed a diet filled with fresh fruits and vegetables, many of which they produced themselves. Maria and her family also consumed little-to-no junk food.

Menounos is still committed to helping those with diabetes. In fact, because she saw first hand the power of communication in the lives of diabetes patients and their families, Menounos is an avid ambassador for the American Diabetes Association.

Maria's experience with diabetes is one that she shares with millions of people worldwide. And if you or someone you care about is suffering from this disease, it's important to be aware of the connection between diabetes and oral health. Recent research has shown a link between two chronic inflammatory conditions: periodontal (gum) disease and diabetes. Evidence consistently reveals that diabetes is a risk factor for increased severity of periodontal disease and conversely, periodontitis is a risk factor for worsening blood glucose control in patients with diabetes and may also increase the risk of diabetic complications. Periodontal inflammation is also associated with an elevated systemic (general body) inflammatory state and an increased risk of major cardiovascular (“cardio” – heart; “vascular” – blood vessel) events such as heart attack, stroke, adverse pregnancy outcomes (e.g., low birth weight and preterm births) and altered blood sugar control in people with diabetes.

If you are interested in learning more about periodontal disease, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Diabetes & Periodontal Disease.” Or, if you are diabetic and fear you may have periodontal disease, you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination. During this private consultation, we will also discuss any questions you have as well as what treatment options will be best for you. And to read the entire interview with Maria, please see the Dear Doctor magazine article “Maria Menounos.”



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978-374-7942

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